SuseInstall

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OpenSuse 12.1 Instructions

sudo zypper install cmake cppunit-devel doxygen fftw3-devel git gsl-devel libjack-devel libqt4-devel libqwtplot3d-devel libSDL-devel libusb-1_0-devel orc portaudio portaudio-devel python-cheetah python-devel python-lxml python-wxGTK python-wxWidgets-devel qwt-devel wxWidgets-devel xmlto

To build gr-qtgui, you might have to point cmake to the location of the header files:

cmake -DQWT_INCLUDE_DIRS=/usr/include/qwt5

Previous Versions

NOTE: Things have been changing in GNU Radio since this was last touched. It could probably use some updating.

This information should work for openSUSE 11.1, and also hopefully SuSE 10.1.

If you choose to use downloadable packages, get the most recent package version, then use rpm to install (rpm -ivh package_filename).

To install dependencies using the YAST2 package manager, issue "sudo /sbin/yast2" and a GUI will be brought up. Search for each package to install, find the correct package name, then hit the spacebar to mark it for installation.

  • gnuradio-core:

As of GNU Radio 3.2, in order for 'configure' to execute, you need the following YAST2 packages, if they are not already installed:

'* autoconf, automake, libtool, make

'* python-devel

'* swig

'* fftw3-devel

'* cppunit-devel

'* boost-devel

'* guile

'* gsl-devel

'* doxygen

'* texlive-latex
In order to execute some parts of gnuradio-core (a runtime dependency), you will need to install NUMPY either from package or from source (http://numpy.scipy.org/). If from source, after extracting execute "sudo python setup.py install".

For GNU Radio 3.5, to build with cmake, also install

'* cmake, cmake-gui

  • GRC: Install the following using YAST2:

'* python-lxml

'* python-gtk

'* libxslt-python
You will also need to install Cheetah from source (http://www.cheetahtemplate.org/). After extracting, execute "sudo python setup.py install".

  • USRP and related components:

'* Install the following using yast2:

'* libusb-devel (the 0.1 series, not the 1.0 series)

'* You will need also install SDCC either from package or source (http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/). If from source, then you also need to install using yast2:

'* bison

'* flex
before doing the usual "./configure && make && sudo make install".

  • SDL-video: Install the following using YAST2:

'* SDL-devel

  • WXGUI: Install the following using YAST2:

'* python-wxGTK

  • JACK audio: Install the following using YAST2:

'* libjack-devel

  • PortAudio audio: Install the following using YAST2:

'* libportaudio-devel

  • ALSA audio: Install the following using YAST2:

'* alsa-devel

  • QTGUI: Install the following using YAST2:

'* libqt4-devel
You will also need to install from package or source QWT (http://qwt.sourceforce.net/) and QwtPlot3d (http://qwtplot3d.sourceforge.net/). For QWT for the usual Linux installation, you need to edit qwtconfig.pri and change the 'INSTALLBASE' to '/usr/local', and 'headers.path' to '$$INSTALLBASE/include/qwt'; then execute 'qmake && make && sudo make install'. For QwtPlot3d, ignore the error when unpacking the tarball; issue "qmake && make" to make. To install, use the following script from the qwtplot3d top-level directory:

sudo mkdir /usr/local/include/qwtplot3d
(cd include; tar cf - . | (cd /usr/local/include/qwtplot3d; sudo tar xf -))
tar cf - lib | (cd /usr/local; sudo tar xf -)

Then follow instructions at BuildGuide.

Accessing the USRP as a non-root user

SuSE 10.1 uses "udev" rather than "hotplug" to automatically handle plug/unplug events for usb devices. To allow users other than root to use the USRP, follow these directions.

Installing GnuRadio and the USRP on Suse 10.1 for the Linux-impaired.

Version 0.21 7 November 2006

What you will need:

  • PC with USB 2.0 and DVD drive,
  • Suse 10.1 DVD,
  • USRP,
  • An internet connection,
  • The better part of an afternoon.

INSTALLING LINUX

Boot from the DVD. Don't use the CD version; it is missing fftw3f.pc and the FFTW package will not install.

Choose your language of choice and click on NEXT.

Select "YES" to accept the license and click on NEXT.

On the "System Analysis" screen select "New Installation" and click on NEXT.

On the "Time Zone" screen set up your clock and click on NEXT.

On the "Desktop" screen select "Gnome" and click on NEXT.

On the "Installation Summary" screen click on "Software" (it should be displaying "Standard Software Gnome 2").

The "Software Selection" screen appears. Click on "Details" to customize your selection.

Select "Package Groups" as the Filter; you should get a tree on the left of the screen.

Click on the "development" branch; click on the "package" menu on the toolbar, scroll down to "All in this list," in the pull down menu, then select "Install."

Under the "Development" tree, click on "KDE" sub-branch; click on the "package" menu on the toolbar, scroll down to "All in this list," in the pull down menu, then select "Do not install."

Under the "Productivity" tree, click on "Scientific" sub-branch; click on the "package" menu on the toolbar, scroll down to "All in this list," in the pull down menu, then select "Install."

Click on the "Libraries" tree; click on the "package" menu on the toolbar, scroll down to "All in this list," in the pull down menu, then select "Install."

Click on "Accept."

You will get a pop-up window with three warnings. Click on the circles next to "do not install flex-old" for the first two warnings and click on the circle next to "do not install gtkl-compat-devel" for the remaining warning.

Click on the "OK, try again" button at the bottom of the pop up window.

An Adobe license window appears; click on the "Accept" button.

A flash player license window appears, click on the "Cancel" button.

The "Installation Settings" window reappears after a long pause.

Click on "Accept" at the lower right hand corner.

A "Confirm" window appears; click "Install."

A "Package Installation" screen appears. Click on the "Details" tab to watch the progress of the install. This would be a good time to take a break; installation will
take about 1 hour to complete.

The system will reboot and the Install screen re-appears.

Enter your hostname and domain and click on Next.

Enter your root password and click on Next. Write down your root password so you don't forget it!

A "Network Configuration" screen appears. If you have DHCP set up, select that option and click on Next.

A "Test Connection" window appears. Click on Next. Assuming all is well with the connection, click on Next again after the test is complete.

An "Online Update" screen appears; select "Configure now" and click on Next.

Wait for a while for the server to be selected.

An "Online Update Configuration" window appears; click on "OK."

Click on the circle next to "Run Update," then click on Next.

An "Update Select" screen appears; click on "Accept"

The YAST package will now be updated. You can update the rest of your system later.

After "Total Progress" reaches 100%, click on Next.

After a pause, the "Update Select" screen reappears. Click on Cancel.

The "Authentication Method" screen appears. Click on the circle next to "Local."

The "New Local User" screen appears. Enter your name, username, and password.

The "Release Notes" screen appears. Click on Next.

The "Hardware Configuration" screen appears. Click on Next.

The "Installation Complete" screen appears. Click on Finish.

Congratulations! You have a shiny new Suse 10.1 box!

INSTALLING SDCC

Log on to your account (not root).
You need to install the SDCC package. You can install from source or use the Suse RPMs.

Installing from source:

Get the source tarball from Sourceforge at
http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=599.
(it will be called "sdcc-src-2.6.0.tar.gz" unless a newer version is available now)
Put the tarball in your home directory.
Double-click on the icon for the tarball. A window will appear; click on "Extract."
Click on "Extract" in the new window that appears. This will create a directory called
"SDCC" in your home directory.
Open up a terminal. (Click on "Applications" on the menu toolbar,scroll up to
"System" in the menu that appears,scroll down to "Terminal" in the next menu that
appears, then click on "Gnome Terminal" in yet another menu that appears)
In the terminal window, type "cd SDCC" and hit Enter.
Now type "./configure" and hit Enter.
Now type "make" and hit Enter.
now type "sudo make install" and hit Enter.
When asked for the root password, enter it.
type "cd .." and hit Enter.

Installing from Suse RPMs

Get the RPMs from sourceforge:
http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=599&package_id=111949
You need two packages, sdcc-common-2.4.0-1.noarch.rpm and sdcc-2.4.0-1-SL90.i586.rpm.
Open up a terminal. (Click on "Applications" on the menu toolbar,scroll up to
"System" in the menu that appears,scroll down to "Terminal" in the next menu that
appears, then click on "Gnome Terminal" in yet another menu that appears)
Install both RPMs with the command

rpm -ivh sdcc*.rpm

INSTALLING GNURADIO

Now it's time to install GnuRadio itself.
Type "svn co !http://gnuradio.org/svn/gnuradio/trunk gnuradio" and hit Enter.
The most current version of GnuRadio is now being loaded onto you machine. When
it's done, note the revision number for future reference.
Type "cd gnuradio" and hit Enter.
Type "./bootstrap" and hit Enter.
Type "./configure" and hit Enter.
You are now ready to install everything except:
gr-audio-osx
gr-audio-portaudio
gr-audio-windows
gr-comedi
gr-ezdop
ezdop

If you needed any of these you willl need to track down the missing dependencies and
install them.

type "make" and hit Enter.
type "make check" and hit Enter.
type "sudo make install" and hit Enter.
When asked for the root password, enter it.

At this point, with a little luck, you have an operational installation.

EXPLORING THE USRP

Connect your USRP (power and USB 2 cables)
There is a tiny little green LED underneath the "A" side receive daughtercard.
It should be flashing at a few times per second.

For the moment you will need to have root priviledges to access the USRP. A procedure to
remove this requirement will appear in the next version of this walkthrough.

type "su" and hit Enter. When prompted for a password, type the root password and hit Enter.
type "export PYTHONPATH=~/gnuradio/lib/python2.4/site-packages" and hit Enter.

You should put this command in your startup file so you won't have to enter it
every time you start up a shell. Instructions will appear will appear in the next version
of this walkthrough.

Type "cd gnuradio-examples/python/usrp" and hit Enter.
Type "python test_counting.py" and hit Enter.
The green LED should be blinking more slowly to indicate a successful load.
You should see messages from "gr_check_counting," with the final message saying something about "enter_LOCKED."
Type a "control-C" character to exit the test.
Type "python benchmark_usb.py" anfd hit Enter.
You should see tests of the USB link up to 32 MB/sec with "OK" displayed after each test.
If you have a daughtercard installed in the "A" connector, you can run a spectrum analyzer.
Type "python usrp_fft.py -d 64 -f 10000000" and hit Enter.
You are now looking at a GUI display of a 1 MHz segment of spectrum centered at 10 MHz.
To change the bandwidth, enter an even decimation factor (256 or lower down to 4) into the "Decim" field.
To change the center frequency, enter the frequency (in Hz) into the "Center freq" field.
You can also enter the frequency in Mhz followed by a capital "M"

At this point you are ready to start exploring the full potential of your new system!