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You probably know already that GNU Radio blocks are available in Python even if they were written in C++. This is done by the help of SWIG, the simplified wrapper and interface generator, which automatically creates glue code to make this possible. SWIG needs some instructions on how to do this, which are put into the <code>swig/</code> subdirectory. Unless doing something extra clever with your block, you will not need to go into the <code>swig/</code> directory; gr_modtool handles all of that for us.
 
You probably know already that GNU Radio blocks are available in Python even if they were written in C++. This is done by the help of SWIG, the simplified wrapper and interface generator, which automatically creates glue code to make this possible. SWIG needs some instructions on how to do this, which are put into the <code>swig/</code> subdirectory. Unless doing something extra clever with your block, you will not need to go into the <code>swig/</code> directory; gr_modtool handles all of that for us.
  
If you want your blocks to be available in the [[GNURadioCompanion|GNU Radio companion]], the graphical UI for GNU Radio, you need to add descriptions of the blocks and put them into <code>grc/</code>. Prior to version 3.8 these descriptions were XML files, but from 3.8 onward they use [[YAML_GRC|YAML instead]].
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If you want your blocks to be available in the [[GNURadioCompanion|GNU Radio companion]], the graphical UI for GNU Radio, you need to add XML descriptions of the blocks and put them into <code>grc/</code>.
  
 
For documentation, <code>docs/</code> contains some instructions on how to extract documentation from the C++ files and Python files (we use Doxygen and Sphinx for this) and also make sure they're available as docstrings in Python. Of course, you can add custom documentation here as well.
 
For documentation, <code>docs/</code> contains some instructions on how to extract documentation from the C++ files and Python files (we use Doxygen and Sphinx for this) and also make sure they're available as docstrings in Python. Of course, you can add custom documentation here as well.

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